• Eknath Easwaran

    “Nothing can be more important than being able to choose the way we think.”
    EKNATH EASWARAN
    (1910–1999)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Practice for Today: Slowing Down "In order to slow down, it is necessary to gradually eliminate activities outside your job and family responsibilities which do not add to your spiritual growth.. . . . more

Please help us spread the word about our YA retreat, November 7-9  Our young adult (YA) weekend retreat in Tomales is coming up soon, and we still have some places available. . . . more

Choose Kindness "As a boy, growing up in a South Indian village, I learned to ride an elephant the way teenagers today learn to drive a car. . . . more

YA Blog Post: Living in Harmony "We are all inclined to get overwhelmed at times and to ask, 'What can I, one person, do to right problems like pollution and hunger?' Gandhi's reply is simple but challenging: you just raise your own consciousness and you will raise the consciousness of the entire world. . . . more

Video Clip: Using Right Speech (2:24 minutes) In this excerpt from a talk on right speech (one of the disciplines from the Buddha's Noble Eightfold Path), Easwaran encourages us to try to focus on people's positive qualities and to try not to dwell on their negative qualities. . . . more

Thought for the Day

October 23

It is the mind that makes one wise or ignorant, bound or emancipated.
   – Sri Ramakrishna

Mental habits are like ditches in the mind. They have to be dug laboriously. But they can also be filled in and new channels can be dug. Take resentment for example. It does not burst full-blown into the mind; it grows. At first you simply expect people to behave towards you in a particular way. If they behave in their own way instead, you get surprised, then irritated. You are digging a little channel in consciousness.

In the early stages, this channel may be only an inch or so deep. Thought may flow down it, but it may also flow somewhere else. Also, the walls are still soft and crumbly; they may cave in and fill the channel a little – for example, when someone you dislike says something kind. There is an element of choice. But every time we respond to a situation with resentment, the channel gets a little deeper. Finally there is a huge Grand Canal in the mind. Then anything at all is enough to provoke a conditioned resentful response. Consciousness pours down the sluice of least resistance.

We can dig new mental channels – kind ways of thinking instead of resentful ones, patience instead of anger. Every time you try to return good will for ill will, love for hatred, you have dug your new, beneficial channel a little deeper. Transforming character, conduct, and consciousness is not a moral problem. It’s an engineering problem.

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