• Eknath Easwaran

    “We all need joy, and we can all receive joy in only one way, by adding to the joy of others.”
    EKNATH EASWARAN
    (1910–1999)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Video Clip: The Perennial Philosophy (3:36 minutes) In this short, profound excerpt from one of his longer talks, Easwaran describes the principles of the Perennial Philosophy, or sanatana dharma in Sanskrit. . . . more

YA Blog Post: The Goal of Life Part 2 "Our supreme purpose in life is not to make a fortune, nor to pursue pleasure, nor to write our name on history, but to discover this spark of the divine that is in our hearts." . . . more

A Practice for Today: Putting Others First "Practice putting the welfare of other people first, before your own. . . . more

New design for the Blue Mountain journal What's the point of slowing down? Read our free, newly-designed Blue Mountain journal to find Easwaran's answer, together with his gentle, practical advice. . . . more

Easwaran on Thomas a Kempis' The Imitation of Christ: Talk 50 This is the 50th in a long series of talks Eknath Easwaran gave on The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis. . . . more

Thought for the Day

April 18

The best way to cheer yourself up is to try to cheer somebody else up.
   – Mark Twain

Often, when a low mood is coming on, sometimes it is because the mind has started to brood upon itself. The things that formerly seemed exciting now elicit no response. In a sense, we have closed down. A friend can talk to us and we will not hear; we can go to a movie and may not even follow the plot. We are utterly absorbed in a hall of mirrors inside, in which we and everyone around us are pushed, pulled, and twisted into fantastic shapes.

There are a number of effective ways of treating these dark moods where they start, within the mind. What helps is to do what your mind is crying out not to do: be with other people, work with them, make yourself take an active interest in what they are doing and saying. This turns attention away from yourself by directing it outward. Once you are more concerned with others, your melancholy is gone; you are alive again.

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