• Eknath Easwaran

    “By virtue of being human, each of us has the capacity to choose, to change, to grow.”
    EKNATH EASWARAN
    (1910–1999)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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YA Blog Post: Easwaran on Meditation and Right Occupation "Remind yourself every day that meditation is not for your benefit alone; it is for the benefit of the whole world." . . . more

Video Clip: The Evolution of the Human Personality (11 minutes) Easwaran gives a dynamic and hopeful explanation of what the Bhagavad Gita calls the gunas - three bonds that can tie us down, he says, to separateness, loneliness, and other problems. . . . more

A Practice for Today: Increasing One-Pointed Attention "When your attention gets caught somewhere other than here and now, for example, in some past event you can't stop dwelling on, use your mantram to get your attention free. . . . more

Easwaran on Thomas a Kempis' The Imitation of Christ: Talk 9 This is the ninth in a long series of talks Eknath Easwaran gave on The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis. . . . more

YA Blog Post: Free Meditation Webinar October 4th, 2014 We hope you'll join us for our free introductory meditation webinar on Saturday, October 4, 2014 at 10:00 a.m . . . more

Thought for the Day

August 23

The test of a man or woman’s breeding is how they behave in a quarrel.
   – George Bernard Shaw

When tempers are frayed, and an argument is in progress, it is very difficult for anyone to listen with courtesy to an opposing point of view. If we could ask the mind on such occasions why it doesn’t listen, it would answer candidly, “Why should I? I already know I’m right.” We may not put it into words, but the other person gets the message: “You’re not worth listening to.” It is this lack of respect that offends people in an argument, much more than any difference of opinion.

But respect can be learned – in part by acting as if we had respect. We show respect by simply listening with complete attention. Try it and see: the action is very much like that of a classical drama. For a while there is “rising action.” The other person’s temper keeps going up; language becomes more and more vivid; everything is heading for a climax. But then comes the denouement. The other person begins to quiet down: his voice becomes gentler, his language kinder, all because you have not retaliated or lost your respect for him.

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