• Eknath Easwaran

    “We all need joy, and we can all receive joy in only one way, by adding to the joy of others.”
    EKNATH EASWARAN
    (1910–1999)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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A Practice for Today: Putting Others First "Practice putting the welfare of other people first, before your own. . . . more

New design for the Blue Mountain journal What's the point of slowing down? Read our free, newly-designed Blue Mountain journal to find Easwaran's answer, together with his gentle, practical advice. . . . more

Easwaran on Thomas a Kempis' The Imitation of Christ: Talk 50 This is the 50th in a long series of talks Eknath Easwaran gave on The Imitation of Christ by Thomas a Kempis. . . . more

A Passage for World Peace: Easwaran Reads the Sutta Nipata Reading the news headlines can leave us feeling sad, angry, or helpless. . . . more

YA Blog Post: Coming Home - Rediscovering Easwaran and Passage Meditation "A country's real wealth is the ambitions and high ideals of its young people." . . . more

Thought for the Day

April 17

If the heart wanders or is distracted, bring it back to the point quite gently and replace it tenderly in its Master’s presence. And even if you did nothing during the whole of your hour but bring your heart back and place it again in Our Lord’s presence, though it went away every time you brought it back, your hour would be very well employed.
   – Saint Francis de Sales

The mind does not like to meditate; it wants to wander. When someone is not doing very well in meditation, one explanation is simple: his or her mind is elsewhere. The early stages of meditation are like a primary school for the mind. At first we are simply trying to get the mind to stay on the school grounds until the last bell rings. This is all we can do at first. The mind has been playing truant for years; when we try to concentrate, it simply is not present. All we can do is stand at the doorstep and whistle, trying to call it back in.

Even if all we do in thirty minutes of meditation is to call the mind back thirty times, we have made great progress. We don’t have to wait for the day when the mind is completely still to receive immense benefits from meditation. As the Bhagavad Gita says, even a little of this discipline protects us from great dangers.

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